Situated between the old city centre, the business district and Warsaw’s largest city park, Central Point certainly does justice to its name. The tower in the city centre is located on the intersection of the capital’s two metro lines, with numerous tram and bus stops nearby and in close vicinity to the Central Railway Station. As a result, the tower offers the best mobility solution of the entire city. 

It is the only high office tower in a neighbourhood dominated by low-rise residential buildings, bars and restaurants, cinemas and theatres, ensuring open views in a perimeter of at least 300 metres. The nearby 15.5 hectare Saxon Garden further enhances that open feeling and provides a relaxing atmosphere, which can be enjoyed during lunchtimes or after work.  

Besides its unique location offering plenty of advantages to its users, Central Point has been thoughtfully designed to create a workplace that enhances the overall well-being and the urban quality of life of all its users. 

Olivier Thiel, Managing Director of Immobel Poland, explains: “A human-centred design was a clear prerequisite. Our architects – a local agency working together with the renowned firm Arquitectonica – therefore designed a building with almost 90% of its surface having access to daylight. Green terraces and a lobby housing a cosy coffee shop give the building a homely feeling. Moreover, a cyclist-friendly infrastructure was set up, including bicycle stands, changing rooms, and showers. Special attention was given to air quality, which – especially in Covid times – is an important feature.” 

I’m proud to say that the building is a textbook example of how contemporary and sustainable design can be integrated in a historical context.

Olivier Thiel Central PointOlivier Thiel, Managing Director of Immobel Poland

The building meets the highest environmental standards, as confirmed by the BREEAM Excellent certificate. 

Olivier continues: “Out of respect for the historic environment and the iconic PAST building, which when finished in 1910 was Poland’s highest building, Central Point’s façade was kept pure and uncluttered. Nevertheless, it was thoughtfully designed, with two ‘wings’ on the south side to avoid overheating during summer. Overall, I’m proud to say that the building is a textbook example of how contemporary and sustainable design can be integrated in a historical context.”

central point